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Hong Kong Public Libraries to be reopened from 29 September resuming normal opening hours

The Hong Kong Central Library (HKCL), six major libraries and 31 district libraries have been reopened earlier (17 Sep).  From 29 September, all other 32 small libraries and mobile libraries will resume service. All reopened public libraries and their students’ study rooms will resume normal opening hours. To help ensure public safety, libraries will continue to implement precautionary measures, including arrangement of cleaning sessions. Please refer to the Details.

With the resumption of book drop service, self-service library stations and reopening of all libraries with normal opening hours, counting of overdue fines shall be resumed from 19 October 2020. Readers are advised to return the overdue items in order not to incur overdue fines.

Typhoon and Other Severe Weather in Hong Kong

Typhoon and Other Severe Weather in Hong Kong

Date & Time: 2014/11/01 (Saturday) 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Venue: Hong Kong Central Library (Lecture Theatre, G/F.)
Speaker: Mr. Terence KUNG (Honorary Secretary, Hong Kong Meteorological Society and Scientific Officer, Hong Kong Observatory)
Organiser: Jointly presented by the Hong Kong Public Libraries and the Hong Kong Meteorological Society
Remarks: •Free admission by ticket. Conducted in Cantonese.
•Please register by phone or in person at Young Adult Library, 6/F of Hong Kong Central Library for admission tickets from 11th October 2014 (Saturday). Each person may obtain two tickets. First come, first served.
Enquiry Telephone Number: 2921 0335

In September last year, Severe Typhoon Usagi posed severe threat to Hong Kong, though it subsequently missed the territory by a narrow margin. The Black rainstorm in the end of March this year caused flooding in a large shopping mall, and brought hail reports in many places. These events remind us that our territory is in every moment facing potential threat from various types of weather disasters. In this talk, we will review some of the historical typhoons and other severe weather events occurred in Hong Kong. The physical mechanisms behind typhoons and severe weather, as well as some monitoring tools and forecasting methods used by meteorologists will be introduced. It is hoped that through this talk, the public’s knowledge in this area can be enriched, and their awareness on disaster prevention can also be raised.